The Lifeways, Landscapes and Wildlife Interpretive Program is a series of workshops, lectures, demonstrations, hands-on student experiences, and cultural events that interprets and emphasizes the tangible connection between environment and people.  This program aims to facilitate the understanding of the local cultural and historical impacts using the following components:

Artist in Residence Series: The Plankhouse hosts a series of Artists-in Residence demonstrations of Chinookan arts and culture during the months of April-June, especially for school groups. Past artists have demonstrated basket making, traditional foods and preparation techniques, and paint-making with a variety of minerals, ores, and clays.  To coordinate your school group trip to the Refuge with the Artist in Residence Series contact RidgefieldEducation@fws.gov or call (360) 887-4106.

Second Sunday Series: The Plankhouse hosts a series of presentations on Chinookan culture, archaeology, and natural history the second Sunday of every month from April-October.

Traditional Skills Workshops: Experienced teachers lead workshops on subjects ranging from wapato gathering/preparation to flintknapping and basket weaving.

Seasonal Gathering Series: The Plankhouse hosts cultural gatherings highlighting significant changes in the seasonal round and focusing on resources and traditions specific to the season.  One of our more notable seasonal gatherings is the Autumn Salmon Bake which is included in the Birdfest festivities in October.

See our calendar for a list of upcoming Lifeways, Landscapes and Wildlife activities in the Plankhouse or contact the Plankhouse Coordinator, Sarah Hill, at (360) 887-4106 for more information.  You can also receive our newsletter and notifications of upcoming events by contacting sarah_hill@fws.gov and requesting to be added to the email list.

*The Plankhouse is ADA accessible through special arrangement. Please call the refuge office during regular business hours if you need special accommodation.

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2014 Second Sunday Event Series

 

September 14, Native Americans in Cinema

The public image of American Indians has been more defined by cinema than that of any other people in history. When one considers, for example, that as many as 25 percent of all films made from 1900 to 1950 were Westerns – which frequently represented American Indians as violent obstacles to progress – the lingering implications are staggering. This conversation, led by cinema scholar Lance Rhoades, will prompt us to address the formidable role cinema has played in producing, perpetuating and challenging perceptions of American Indians, past and present. This subject matter will challenge preconceptions and will raise questions about identity, stereotypes and cinema that have no easy answers.

Rhoades-Friends of the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge

September 18th, Columbia River Art

 Nature Series Poster 8.5x11 Artist 8.27.14PQ